Tag Archives: Food

Don’t Waste the Hunt

Proverbs 12:27 

“The slothful man roasteth not that which he took in hunting: but the substance of a diligent man is precious.”

Hunting

I am not a hunter. I am a gatherer.

Unlike some of my more outdoorsy friends and relatives, I am not much for going out and killing things, even for food. Don’t get me wrong, though, I have gone hunting in my younger years; it’s just not something I enjoy. I’d rather go to a restaurant and hunt down a steak.

The biggest gripe that I have with hunting, however, is having to dress the animals you kill in the field. If you don’t know what am talking about, that means gutting the animal that was just an hour before frolicking in the wilderness.

I do not enjoy the smell of blood in the morning, especially mixed with sweaty camouflage.

Wasted Kill

This proverb makes mention of a hunter, but the hunter is a lazy man, one so lazy that instead of preparing the slain animal for food, he just lets it spoil. What could have been food for his family and himself is allowed to rot and go to waste. That’s just wrong.

Some people kill just for sport, which I believe is unethical.

However, there are others who never kill anything, but they waste life, nevertheless. How sad is that?

Life is Precious

I believe that all life is precious, even the life of the animals used for food. It’s not that God gives deer and squirrel souls, but He is responsible for the life within them. After all, He was their Creator.

An ethical hunter knows this, and that is why the above proverb says, “but the substance of a diligent man is precious.” A lot goes into the hunt for game, including time, money, and skill. A wise man doesn’t waste what opportunity he has been given; he puts it to use.

The “Game” of Life

What is it that you have been working for all your life? What have you gone to school for, or practiced for? Was all of that for nothing? Did you hunt down time, only to let it lie there and rot in the forests of life?

Don’t waste the opportunities or talents God has given you. But more than that, don’t let go to waste the things for which you have hunted and caught. What a waste of life if you do.

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Understandable Thievery

Proverbs 6:30-31

“Men do not despise a thief, if he steal to satisfy his soul when he is hungry; But if he be found, he shall restore sevenfold; he shall give all the substance of his house.”
Recap

Over the last 6 verses we have seen instruction dealing with a “whorish” woman, stuff related to walking on fire, and sleeping with hot coals. Who said the Bible was boring?

All in all, we have read nothing but warnings detailing the dangers of an “evil” woman. As a matter of fact, Solomon made it clear that the commandments of a father and the laws of a mother (6:20) were to be worn around the neck (6:21) specifically for the purpose of protecting one from a sweet-talking hussy (6:24; “hussy” was my word, not Solomon’s).

So, why is it that we now read of a hungry man stealing food? Well, as we will see, the purpose is to contrast a legitimate need and an understandable crime with an illegitimate desire and a crime that has no excuse – adultery.

Hunger

I have never gone more than a day and a half without food, so when it comes to the gnawing pains of true hunger I am not an expert. I have experienced hunger pangs, which are short reminders that our body wants to be fed really soon. However, I have never experienced the physical and emotional terrors that come as a result of literal starvation.

From everything I have read, hunger can drive sane men and women crazy. Hunger can make men do just about anything to survive, including eating things that would normally cause one to vomit. I’ve even been told that hunger is one of the most painful ways to die.

Is it any wonder, then, why some men would stoop to stealing food? If it meant the difference between life or death; if one’s body was convulsed by pain, eating its own tissue for energy; who could blame a normally law-abiding citizen for illegally taking another’s food?

Wrong, but not Hated

Solomon said “men do not despise a thief” if he steals because he’s hungry. He doesn’t excuse stealing, but acknowledges that sometimes a man’s hunger can make him do regrettable things. This type of man is to be pitied, not despised. At least his need was legitimate, and his crime understandable.

If we were to despise anyone, we should despise those who won’t give to the poor, or charge so much that the poor are forced to steal. Don’t hate the man who is just trying to survive.

Still a Crime

Stealing, however, for whatever reason, is still stealing, and a price must be paid. A crime is still a crime. That is why, even though a man be hungry, breaking God’s commandment (thou shalt not steal) must have consequences.

It should be noted, though, that when we force others into doing wrong, we are also guilty of the same crime. Many people are hungry only because others are greedy and selfish.

If you would like to donate to help feed the hungry, click here.


Celebrating His Coming: Thoughts for the 1st Week of Advent – Day 4

But thou, Beth–lehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting. –Micah 5:2, KJV

bake baking bread breakfast

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Did you know that there is only one reference in the entire Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament) that mentions where the coming Messiah would be born?

Yet it reminds us that God takes care of all of the details, even to the smallest piece.

Micah reminds us that, though we are often faithless and destitute, out of the House of Bread (Bethlehem) would come the faithful Bread of Life (Jesus – John 6:48) who will be lifted to the highest place in the highest heaven.

Micah longed for His coming, as we long for His return.

Faithful Father, fill us with the life of Your Son, the faithful One who redeems and satisfies.


Peace and Strife

Better is a dry morsel, and quietness therewith, than an house full of sacrifices with strife. -Proverbs 17:1 KJV

The last time I wrote on this verse, I talked about the families of close friends of ours who had lived with my wife and me.

Once again, I am going to talk about a friend who had lived with us.

This (grown and middle aged) friend had a girlfriend with grown kids of her own. Naturally, he was over at her house regularly. Both of them are devout Christians and attend church regularly.

However, her children pursue very worldly lifestyles, and when living at home were quite selfish, lazy, and confrontational when their wants and needs were not met to their expectations.

Our friend began telling us that he almost hated going over there. Rather, he liked coming into our home, because there was an air of peace that he did not feel when her kids were around.

We did not always have the greatest food, but he could sit in peace. We set high expectations with grace, but still with firmness.

Which home describes yours? Is your household one the promotes peace or one full of strife? Do you tolerate worldliness in your home or combat it with biblical teachings?


Fast(ing) Food

The righteous eateth to the satisfying of his soul: but the belly of the wicked shall want. -Proverbs 13:25 KJV

Teenage boys can certainly seem wicked with the way they treat each other and can seem selfish. The proof, based on this verse, would seem to be that their bellies are always wanting more food!

Obviously, this is not what this passage is about.

Recently, a new round of studies was released again confirming the benefits of intermittent fasting. And what does the Bible teach? Fasting, as a way to draw nearer to God and seek His direction, is expected of the faithful.

Those who regularly fast tend to appreciate food more appropriately. They typically eat healthier, because coming out of a fast properly matters. And when it is known food will not be consumed for a time, they want good food in them before and after to remain healthy.

They may also be more appreciative of the food they receive.

But there is purpose.

They tend to be seeking God, even when eating.

But wicked people may not only think fasting is stupid but mock those who do. Or they think those who fast are either judgmental or legalistic.

And, instead, their stomachs become their gods. (Just look at the number of restaurants, eating fads, and TV shows about food in our Western culture.)


Appreciate What You Have

The following are three different translations of the same verse:

The slothful man roasteth not that which he took in hunting: but the substance of a diligent man is precious. – Proverbs 12:27 KJV

A lazy hunter doesn’t roast his game, but to a diligent person, his wealth is precious. – Proverbs 12:27 CSB

Lazy people don’t even cook the game they catch, but the diligent make use of everything they find. – Proverbs 12:27 NLT

However you look at it, according to this verse there are two types of people in this world: those who don’t care about what they have and those who do.

The slothful or lazy hunter – lazy people in general – are so often the most blessed people in the world. I mean, seriously, isn’t it the case where so often they have more than they need, more than enough to make something of themselves, yet let it all rot?

People today are so far removed from those of “the greatest generation” that they have no idea how good they actually have it. The poorest people in America are richer than many of the wealthy in other countries, and what they can waste on a daily basis is proof positive.

But to the diligent person…the person who works hard…the person who doesn’t expect a handout, but understands the value of persistence…the one who knows that tomorrow’s hunt might not go as well…the one who is grateful for what he has…what he has is precious, because he appreciates what it took to possess it.

Remember that “the LORD your God gives you the power to gain wealth” (Deut. 8:18), and whatever you collect in the hunting trip of life is ultimately a reflection of the mercy of God. Don’t take it for granted, and for heaven’s sake don’t waste it.


Sustaining the Righteous

The Lord will not suffer the soul of the righteous to famish: but he casteth away the substance of the wicked. -Proverbs 10:3, KJV

Several other translations write this verse to say that God will not let His people go hungry, but He denies the cravings and desires of the wicked.

We can see this as the same kind of promise Jesus gave:

“Look at the birds, whom God feeds. Look at the flowers, whom God clothes better than Solomon in his great clothes. How much more does the Father want to take care of you?” (Matthew 6:25-34)

My wife and I have been through much in our relatively short nine years of marriage, times when there was not enough money in our bank account to pay all the bills, let alone to buy basic necessities. But God took care of us during those times.

However, Jesus started this section of scripture by saying, “Isn’t life more than food and clothing?” (Matthew 6:25)

What, then does God’s Word promise us, if we cannot trust that we will always have enough food to feel full?

In John 4, Jesus was talking to His disciples, immediately after the Samaritan woman by the well left Him, when He said, “I have food you do not know about … to do the will of the one who sent me.” (vv. 32-34)

Back in Matthew 6, He says to seek first the Kingdom of God, and everything else will be given to you (v. 33).

Therefore, the KJV certainly says it best in today’s verse, for it is implied that God takes care of His people, but the deeper and more obvious (based on the plain reading) meaning is this:

God fulfils the spiritual needs of His people, saving and nourishing their souls, but He ultimately removes the wicked, casting them into Hell.